Slow Thinking Reduces Crime and Dropout Rates in Chicago

Philip Cusic, program manager at Youth Guidance Becoming a Man (B.A.M.), talks to students at Chicago Public Schools about slowing down and thinking deliberately before they act.

Photo above: Philip Cusic, program manager at Youth Guidance Becoming a Man (B.A.M.), talks to students at Chicago Public Schools about slowing down and thinking deliberately before they act.


Chicago Booth Assistant Professor Anuj Shah explains how experiments on the South and West Sides are preventing violent crime and lowering arrest rates among inner city youth.

Anuj Shah

As gun violence in Chicago makes headlines across the country, a group of researchers are finding success in some of Chicago’s most dangerous neighborhoods with a new approach to reducing crime and increasing school engagement among inner city youth.

This approach teaches young people to think more slowly in moments of conflict.

In field experiments in Chicago, the slow-thinking approach reduced violent-crime arrests by up to 44 percent.

One of the researchers is WBEZ Morning Shift interview with Shah and Philip Cusic, the program manager at Youth Guidance Becoming A Man (B.A.M.) at Chicago Public Schools.

  • Watch slow thinking in action at Youth Guidance Becoming a Man (B.A.M.) at Chicago Public Schools: VIDEO LINK HERE